When

Saturday September 9
Registration Starts at Noon

Speaker Sessions from 1pm to 6pm

Where

Kiva Auditorium
Albuquerque Convention Center
401 2nd St NW
Albuquerque, NM


When

Saturday September 9
Registration Starts at Noon

Speaker Sessions from 1pm to 6pm

Where

Kiva Auditorium
Albuquerque Convention Center
401 2nd St NW
Albuquerque, NM



Ideas form our everyday existence. From the way we interact with our loved ones to our professional aspirations; how we measure our self worth to the value we place on scientific discovery; how we choose to spend our money to how we choose to spend our time; we navigate the world based on the ideas we encounter. Our society is based on the values and relationships of its citizens, and, in this way, the ideas that we experience are a driving force in shaping our communities.

Ideas form our everyday existence. From the way we interact with our loved ones to our professional aspirations; how we measure our self worth to the value we place on scientific discovery; how we choose to spend our money to how we choose to spend our time; we navigate the world based on the ideas we encounter. Our society is based on the values and relationships of its citizens, and, in this way, the ideas that we experience are a driving force in shaping our communities.


Tickets On Sale Now!

  • VIP Tickets $100
    VIP Ticket TEDxABQ Main Event 2017
  • General Admission Tickets $50
    General Admission Ticket TEDxABQ Main Event 2017
  • Student Tickets $25
    Student Ticket TEDxABQ Main Event 2017

The Speakers

The Speakers

Andrea Mammoli

Andrea Mammoli

Imagine a long term major failure of the electricity grid in New Mexico – this could have happened in the 2011 “big freeze,” had the record cold weather lasted a few days longer. That would have meant no electricity, no heating, no running water, no sewage, no traffic control, and eventually no food for many New Mexicans, for days or even weeks. The full consequences of such an event are difficult to imagine. Can we design a system that is more resilient to these increasingly frequent events, natural or man-made? Can such a system accommodate lots of clean energy, generated locally or remotely? Can we afford to build such a system? We can, if we do a good job of combining new technology, fast arriving, with existing power distribution infrastructure, and if communities, utilities, and government cooperate to make this happen. Andrea Mammoli tells the good news.

Andrea Mammoli is a professor of mechanical engineering at the University of New Mexico, and director of the Center for Emerging Energy Technologies, an organization dedicated to research on the integration of distributed energy resources on the electricity grid through system architecture and controls. Mammoli has been active in the field of distributed energy systems since 2005, with projects including solar-assisted HVAC in commercial buildings, building-scale energy storage, distribution-level PV and battery systems, and microgrids, in the context of optimization and controls leading to better economics and enhanced resilience. He conducts research in collaboration with the Electric Power Research Institute, Sandia National Laboratories, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, among others. Mammoli obtained a Ph.D. in mechanical and materials engineering in 1995 from the University of Western Australia, and was Director’s Fellow at Los Alamos National Laboratory between 1995 and 1997 in the Energy and Process Engineering group, prior to joining UNM.

Andrea Romero

Andrea Romero

Living dinosaurs—or, ostriches—walk the earth as some of the healthiest, most sustainable and valuable resources producing animal on earth. Ostriches compete for the greatest immune system on earth, best steak producing animal, best plumage, best leather — the list goes on. They also produce the largest egg on earth, are the largest bird on earth, never digs its head in the sand, has an eyeball bigger than its brain, are the fastest bipedal runner on earth, and so much more. We’re welcoming these incredible animals presence to New Mexico to showcase their endless potential and are bringing their products to market through Tall Foods. Why raise anything else when you can raise ostrich?

Andrea Romero has an obsession for fundamentals, looking to dinosaurs—ahem, ostriches—to help bring sustainable meat proteins to the market by raising desert birds in the high desert of New Mexico to fight climate change from factory farmed meat and find a food secure future in delicious ostrich meats. A business consultant during the standard workweek, this weekend ranchera loves to get amongst it, working with entrepreneurs, community leaders, policy-makers, dreamers, and go-getters. A Santa Fe native, she traveled the world, living in California (Stanford alumni), Mozambique, and Washington, DC. She’s back in NM to build businesses and make as much positive social impact as possible.

Barry Krakow, MD

Barry Krakow, MD

Why do you wake up at night?  What causes these awakenings that prevent sleeping through the night? How do these middle of the night interruptions lead to insomnia, the prolonged episodes where you desperately desire sleep yet cannot catch one wink let alone forty?  Most insomniacs imagine stress, an overactive mind, or a genetic background causes this vexing sleep loss.  Remarkably, these questions had never been researched until we conducted a study on 20 classic insomniacs, all of whom believed their problems were due to stress, racing thoughts or a genetic predisposition. In a landmark study, published in the journal SLEEP, we demonstrated 90% of awakenings experienced by these insomniacs were preceded by a disruption in their breathing while asleep. In effect, we found a major, and likely primary, cause for why people wake up at night and have continued to research and demonstrate this physiological breathing problem in thousands of insomnia patients.

A lifelong insomniac, Barry Krakow was fortunate to gain seven years (1979-1986) of blessed relief—four years in medical school and three at UNM School of Medicine, completing an internal medicine residency. Seven years of sleep deprivation cures most insomniacs… temporarily. Soon after, divine providence guided him to a sleep medicine career as a clinical specialist and sleep researcher, studying and treating chronic nightmare and insomnia patients at Maimonides Sleep Arts & Sciences, sleep medical center, and Sleep & Human Health Institute, sleep research facility. In the 1990s, Krakow learned first-hand how unwanted bouts of sleeplessness (insomnia) were not caused solely by the standard explanations found in nearly all medical and psychological textbooks. Insomnia was far more complex and ultimately proved to be intricately linked to sleep breathing problems. Since then, his quarter of a century quest to map out connections between insomnia and sleep-disordered breathing yielded results beyond anything he would have dreamed possible.

Eyal Aharoni, PhD

Eyal Aharoni, PhD

If you had the power to foresee who will commit a crime by peering into their brain, would you use it? Cognitive scientist Eyal Aharoni’s cutting-edge research with New Mexico’s Mind Research Network forces us to confront uneasy questions about the proper role of emerging “neuro-prediction” technologies in decisions to punish, release, and rehabilitate criminal offenders on the basis of scientific evidence about their individual risk.

Dr. Eyal Aharoni is a cognitive scientist best known for his research and scholarship on the human brain’s contribution to our understanding of impulsive, antisocial behavior. Aharoni has served as a behavioral scientist for the RAND Corporation with a focus on criminal justice reform. He is currently a professor of Psychology, Philosophy, and Neuroscience at Georgia State University where he applies interdisciplinary methods to the study of criminal and legal decision making. His research is made possible in part by the New Mexico Corrections Department and its incarcerated population, by the MacArthur Foundation, and by the Mind Research Network and its collaborators.

Jannell MacAulay, PhD

Jannell MacAulay, PhD

We all want to perform our best in every facet of our lives. In fact, each of us strives to maintain or even accelerate our professional success without sacrificing ourselves, specifically our health and relationships, along the way. But it is extremely difficult to do in reality! Dr. MacAulay, military leader and pilot, academic, educator, and mother of two, relied on her experience, education, and training to achieve high performance. After an unconventional wake-up call spotlighted her performance vulnerability, she realized how much of her moment-to-moment life she was missing and how it was adversely affecting her health and her ability to thrive at work and at home. How many of us struggle with this same dilemma? Dr. MacAulay shares her solution to high performance under stress, which also allows her to cultivate the skills for personal care and recovery.

Dr. Jannell MacAulay specializes in performance under stress and creating mindful leaders who thrive in their workspace and life space. She is a USAF Lieutenant Colonel, the director of Human Performance and Leadership for the 58th Special Operations Wing, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico, and an Air Force Profession of Arms Center of Excellence instructor. She previously commanded the 400-member joint 305th Operations Support Squadron. She is a US Air Force Academy graduate with a master’s in Exercise Physiology and a PhD focused in Strategic Health & Human Performance. Dr. MacAulay is also a wellness, yoga & mindfulness educator, holds a certificate in plant-based nutrition, and is the founder and president of the 501c3 non-profit organization, Healthy Body Healthy Life. She is a combat veteran with 3000 hours in the C-21, C-130, & KC-10 aircraft. She is a military spouse and mother of two active and veggie-loving kiddos.

Juli Hendren

Juli Hendren

Can you really learn and understand another person’s story through the performing arts? People are often searching for the tools they need to interpret the world around them. Experiencing the performing arts from another culture humanizes world events and politics. It connects people. Juli Hendren shares with you how to find courage and compassion in your theatre seat.

Juli Hendren has a deep passion for cultural exchange and understanding through the performing arts. She is a founding member and artistic director of Tricklock Company, a devised theatre ensemble based in Albuquerque, with a focus on international touring. She is also curator of The Revolutions International Theatre Festival, an international festival founded in 2001 which produces performances, workshops, and cultural exchange events in New Mexico. She is a director, writer, actor, and teacher who has taught and performed across the United States, Canada, Europe as well as China, Uganda and Colombia. Hendren was a part of the Theatre Communications Group delegation to Cuba in 2015, Chile in 2017, and Spain in 2017 as a representative of New Mexico in the World Theatre Congress. Juli is a member of Theatre Without Borders and the Global Theatre Initiative.

Kina Murphy, PhD

Kina Murphy, PhD

It is estimated that by 2050 30% of the world biodiversity may be extinct. Sustainable development and reduced land conversion are currently promoted as the number one way to slow climate change and halt the ever increasing mass extinctions occurring across the globe. Extractive industries cause some of the most abrupt and extensive forms of land-use change. They not only impact biodiversity but destroy ecological processes and cause land degradation that has cascading effects on adjacent communities. It is clear that all people rely on extractive industries and that there is an imperative to discover ways to develop while also increasing biodiversity. Kina Murphy examines whether current net positive impact policies are actually working and explore how a paradigm shift requiring all businesses to show a net positive impact on biodiversity could reverse climate change trends and slow the loss of biodiversity.

Having grown up in state and National Parks, Dr. Kina Murphy has always had a love for wilderness. After watching many of the places she grew up in transformed into steel and concrete, she quickly realized that the only way to truly protect biodiversity is by engaging those that impact it the most: large corporations. Today, Kina focuses her work on how to increase biodiversity in areas that have been heavily impacted by resource extraction. She has decades of experience working in more than 10 countries where she has focused on everything from biodiversity monitoring and market-based approaches to conservation to community-based conservation planning and policy. She assists companies and lenders in adopting and promoting practices that benefit biodiversity and ecosystem services and coordinates with governments to support the establishment of policies and regulations that create opportunities for better conservation outcomes.

Rick Allred

Rick Allred

Fear tends to stop people from pursuing their passions, even the smallest passion. What if, the way past that little voice in a person’s head saying, “Play it safe!” was just to have the next conversation with someone? What new possibilities for adventure would open up? This is what happened when Rick Allred read one book that inspired one project to take one million paper cranes to the Peace Memorial Park in Hiroshima, Japan. Find a passion. Talk to strangers. Create an adventure.

Rick Allred, a graduate of New Mexico State University, is committed to people pursuing their passions. Allred’s passion for photography started back in 1986. He currently teaches photography workshops at the Santa Fe Photographic Workshops and classes at craftsy.com. He is passionate about growing as a human being and encourages others to explore and discover their humanity as a means to creating a life they love. His explorations have taken him from tracking navigation satellites in Thule, Greenland, to photographer specialist at the Space Center in Alamogordo, New Mexico, to head of the photography department at the Hui No’Eau Visual Art Center in Maui, Hawaii, and back to Santa Fe, while pursuing an MFA in photography in Main. Allred finds that the beginning of adventure starts with that first step. In 2017, he took that first step by creating “In the Folds of Peace,” a project to start conversations and take one million paper cranes to Hiroshima, Japan.

George McGraw

George McGraw

George McGraw wants to change the way you think about water. George runs DigDeep in Los Angeles, which he founded. DigDeep is the only global water organization working in the U.S. – empowering Americans to build and manage their own community water systems, including the award-winning Navajo Water Project in New Mexico.

George is an avid speaker and writer, and has guest lectured at universities around the world. He has been published by the New York Times, the Huffington Post and several law reviews; he has been profiled by NPR, Vice and CBS News, and he has spoken at events hosted by the Clinton Foundation, WeDay, the World YMCA, and Ford.

George was recently named one of the 17 “Local Globalists” by the UN Foundation. He has a Masters in International Law from the United Nations University for Peace in Costa Rica.

Ronen Polsky

Ronen Polsky

To date, the personal diabetes meter is the only true commercial success that has found widespread use and allows individuals to perform at home medical blood tests without a specialist present and use the corresponding results to make an informed medical decision. However, with the advent of wearable technologies, a new paradigm in healthcare is on the horizon. The ability to continuously monitor a range of relevant physiological conditions throughout a person’s normal routine will allow unprecedented medical information to be collected that saves time, money, and ultimately will assist the healthcare specialist and lead to a dramatic improvement in quality of life. Unfortunately, first generation wearable technology falls fall short and the prospect of a universal Star Trek “tricorder” medical device is still far away. Microneedle technology being developed at Sandia National Laboratories and the University of New Mexico might be the first technological solution to this problem.

Dr. Ronen Polsky was raised in Las Cruces, New Mexico and is a trained analytical chemist. He has over 60 publications and written three book chapters on subjects ranging from novel nanomaterials, three-dimensional battery electrodes and electrochemical biosensing devices. After a one-year post-doctoral fellowship at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, he began working at Sandia National Laboratories in 2005. He recently began a program using microneedles for the transdermal sensing of physiological markers for human performance testing and in collaboration with the University of New Mexico Medical School is performing clinical trials for the technology.

Roslynn Gallegos, LMSW

Roslynn Gallegos, LMSW

In 2015, just a year after her debut on the TEDxABQ stage, Roslynn Gallegos was diagnosed with Chordoma, a form of cancer that impacts one in a million people. Through the psychological, physical, and emotional traumas of treatment and recovery, she has been making sense of one piece of advice she received from a cancer survivor: how to choose life.

Roslynn Gallegos received her MSW from New Mexico Highlands University School of Social Work. She is a licensed social worker currently working at MAS Charter School as a college and career counselor. She also co-owns a private practice in Albuquerque and provides assessments and services to the area. Roslynn is passionate about social justice and quality of life. She is a cancer survivor and has been in remission for a little over a year after battling Chordoma. She hopes to use her experience to bring members of her community together to promote a higher quality of life for citizens of New Mexico.

More Speakers To Be Announced


Tickets On Sale Now!

  • VIP Tickets $100
    VIP Ticket TEDxABQ Main Event 2017
  • General Admission Tickets $50
    General Admission Ticket TEDxABQ Main Event 2017
  • Student Tickets $25
    Student Ticket TEDxABQ Main Event 2017